Star Trek: Attack Wing Review

JL Updated January 28, 2015

Ironically enough, it's a line about the Millennium Falcon that best sums up how I feel about Star Trek:  Atack Wing, the new game from Wizkids that borrows the Flight Path system from FFG's Star Wars:  X-Wing.  "She may not look like much, but she's got it where it counts."

Let's get the glaring fact that Attack Wing does not look as good as X-Wing out of the way first.  Yes, the paint aps aren't great.  There's a couple things that are downright ugly.  The cardstock is thin, and the scale?  There isn't any.  Seing as how Attack Wing's main competition is X-Wing, arguably the best looking game on the market right now, why Wizkids didn't feel compelled to step up the plate to go toe to toe with it is a mystey, and as Captain Kirk would say, I don't like mysteries.  They give me a bellyache, and I've got a beauty right now.  So with that unfortunate bit of business out of the way, let's address the cold, hard fact that I'm sure X-Wing affinados are neither going to want to hear nor believe:  Attack Wing is the better game.

"Woah, woah, how is that possible," you ask.  "Not only is the game ugly, but it's Star Trek.  Star Wars is always cooler than Star Trek."  First off, you're wrong, and second, hear me out.  Yes, Attack Wing is the same system and by and large plays exactly like X-Wing.  Yet there's differences all throughout that really do set it apart.  Some of them subtle, some not quite so.

 

 

 


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One night during the summer of 1997, Josh Look's cool uncle who owned a comic shop taught him how to play Magic the Gathering. The game set off his imagination in a way that he could not sleep that night, and he's been fascinated by games ever since. He spent many afternoons during his high school years skipping homework to play Dungeons & Dragons and paint Warhammer minatures, going on to discover hobby board games in his early 20s. He's been a writer for Fortress Ameritrash and is the creator and co-host of the geek culture podcast, The Wolfman's Lounge. He enjoys games that encourage a heavy amount of table talk and those that explore their themes beyond just their settings.

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