Articles by Lewis Pulsipher

68 results - showing 11 - 20
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Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 4600   0
[Revised from my blog post at http://pulsiphergamedesign.blogspot.com/2013/11/on-horns-of-dilemma.html . ]   In the following I’ll be using quotes gleaned from online discussions, from players and a well-known designer.  These are all personal observations, of course, and anecdotal evidence.  We simply don’t have the “scientific” evidence about games to “prove” any particular point of view.  You’ll have to examine your own experience to make an evaluation.   As usual, I try to consider video and tabletop games rather than focus on just one or the other.  The major divide in game design isn’t...
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated September 20, 2016 3762   0
When I originally wrote some ruminations about magical numbers and boardgames, Steven Davis suggested I should talk about this in relation to card games, such as card hand size.  I’m not a person who plays standard card games, though I have played Old Maid, Canasta, Euchre, and even Poker in the distant past, and still may play Oh Hell once a year.  But I’ve never played Uno, let alone Hearts or Spades or Gin Rummy.  But lately I find myself designing games that use cards, though not the standard deck.
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 4532   0
In the course of designing “nano-games” that have between 17 and 20 pieces for two sides and very small boards that fit on part of a postcard, I again had occasion to wonder if there is some kind of "sweet spot" or "magical number" of pieces and spaces for a boardgame (or any other kind, for that matter) where pieces occupy locations?  I’ve seen several queries from novice designers asking if there’s an ideal board size, and my immediate reaction has been “it depends”. This question could be expanded to “is there a sweet spot in the number of...
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 2920   0
  (While I begin by talking about RPGs, I am later going to generalize to all kinds of tabletop and video games - “sit-down games”.)   When I used to write lots of articles about RPGs for White Dwarf, Dragon, and other magazines three decades ago, I mostly wrote two kinds of things: game rules, and advice about how to play and especially how to referee Dungeons & Dragons successfully.  I rarely wrote settings; and only occasionally in the magazines did I write adventures, which are a combination of rules and setting/story. ...
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 3378   0
It’s going to take a while to get to the point of buyers versus players: please bear with me.   In earlier posts I’ve wondered what the effect of free to play (F2P) video games would have on tabletop gaming.  We already know that it’s a disruptive force in video gaming.  F2P games have helped put pressure on AAA console games and have helped ruin the market for mid-level console games.  They also put video game developers in a dilemma, because F2P requires the game to hold back some of the things that make it...
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 3120   0
Game Designer Survey Results   In the last half of December through the first part of February I distributed a survey for game designers on the Internet:  "This is a short (10 questions, five minutes or less) survey for people who call themselves game designers, video or tabletop (which is as good a way to define who game designers are as any other)."  In the end, 142 respondents have had a game published commercially, along with 46 self-publishers, more than half of the 346 respondents.  Here are the results.   Because...
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 3724   0
(Eric Hanuise and I have tried since September to get this published amongst the Boardgamegeek designer diaries, with Eric even posting it in a waiting queue in correct format, without success.  We are both puzzled about why we've been completely ignored.  So we've finally decided to post it elsewhere.  LEP) Dragon Rage "Designer Diary" Lewis Pulsipher   While Dragon Rage was originally published in 1982, it was reissued in a much higher-quality format with an additional map and many additional scenarios in Belgium in 2011.  The game was very expensive to...
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 4016   0
Names of games are important to help a potential buyer understand what the game is about, and to invoke certain emotions or points of view that may help persuade the customer to buy the game.  For example, “Dragon Rage” tells you a lot about that game.  Yet the trend in Eurostyle boardgames for a while was that names told you absolutely nothing about the game: Carcassonne, San Juan, St. Petersburg, Puerto Rico, those titles tell you absolutely nothing. Perhaps such uninformative titles are selected because most of the good game titles have already been used. It may also...
Trying to define "the board"
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 3256   0
Trying to define “the board” On LinkedIn someone asked if there were industry definitions and names for the various aspects of a game board. There aren’t any that I know of, but it’s worth trying to analyze what we actually have in a “game board”. We’re accustomed to thinking that a video game has an interface, but so do tabletop games. The interface enables the player to see what’s happening in the game, and to manipulate the game, to tell the game what the player...
Member Blogs L lewpuls Updated January 28, 2015 3487   0
This is a short (10 questions, five minutes or less) survey for people who call themselves game designers, video or tabletop (which is as good a way to define who game designers are as any other). Keep in mind we are talking about game design, not about programming, art, sound, or other parts of game production. I am using the free SurveyMonkey application, which is limited in the number of respondents, but in the unlikely event this copy gets full (this copy has 25 responses, two others are full) I'll include another link there. This announcement will be...
68 results - showing 11 - 20
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