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Interesting article in the Washington Post

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19 Oct 2019 08:13 #302579 by jay718
Interesting article in the Post yesterday about tabletop gaming and gender by a woman who also wrote a book that came out last month called Your Move: What Board Games Teach us About Life.


www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/how-my-ro...cf86eb67e_story.html
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19 Oct 2019 15:12 - 19 Oct 2019 15:13 #302583 by Gary Sax
It is amazing how RPGs had such an unwelcoming basement male nerd culture going on when, from my perspective, the nature of their play makes them so flexible to explore all sorts of things.

It seems like things are changing. I wonder how much the internet had to do with that.
Last edit: 19 Oct 2019 15:13 by Gary Sax.

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19 Oct 2019 18:37 #302586 by Erik Twice
At least around here RPGs have always had a more welcoming atmosphere than other kinds of games and more women played them.

But the situation is very different int he US. In my first geek conventions (say, 2006+) the split was 50/50 between sexes.

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19 Oct 2019 18:49 #302587 by Gary Sax
I mainly played in the 90s, so just my experiences. It was definitely a male centric culture in the U.S, misogynist in its own weird obsequious way. Most nerds of the times considered themselves outcast from traditional masculinity, yet still worshipped at it. Again, I think things have really changed in the RPG space.

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19 Oct 2019 19:04 #302588 by Sagrilarus

Gary Sax wrote: I mainly played in the 90s, so just my experiences. It was definitely a male centric culture in the U.S, misogynist in its own weird obsequious way. Most nerds of the times considered themselves outcast from traditional masculinity, yet still worshipped at it. Again, I think things have really changed in the RPG space.


In the 70s I had heard of two female players total. D&D was very technical, complex, detailed. It was largely about combat.
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19 Oct 2019 19:10 #302589 by Gary Sax
The D&D art book has a really interesting discussion of how involved women were at the *very* beginning as artists and also players, but how they kind of disappeared as things got moving.

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20 Oct 2019 11:30 #302600 by Shellhead
I started role-playing in the late '70s, and all the players seemed to be guys back then, even in other groups that I didn't play in. By the '80s, we occasionally had a girl in the group, but it was always somebody's girlfriend who was just trying to spend more time around her guy.

I moved to the Twin Cities in the early '90s, and recruited a new group from scratch through one of the local gaming shops. I was soon running a weekly game for 11 players, and that included 3 female players. A couple of years later, I briefly played in an Amber diceless campaign where half the group was female.

Since the late '90s, geek culture has gone mainstream, probably thanks to the internet. For a few years in a row, I attended a small local convention for diceless rpgs, and half the players were women. One of my friends currently hosts an all-female D&D campaign. His girlfriend is the DM and he just serves up snacks and sometimes plays NPCs, as needed.
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