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Michael Barnes
August 18, 2022
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Godtear Beats the Odds - Review

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Scout Board Game Review

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July 28, 2022
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The Split - Review

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July 21, 2022
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Bugs: Recent Topics Paging, Uploading Images & Preview (11 Dec 2020)

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What SHAKESPEARE NOVEL(s) have you been reading?

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10 Sep 2014 19:59 #186868 by scrumpyjack
In honour of the recent Shakespearean digression in the forums, anyone been reading any Shakespeare recently? What are your favourite novels? I recently read through Hamlet for the first time since high school. Hamlet (the main character) infuriates me to no end much like he did before, but my god that final scene is something else.

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10 Sep 2014 20:54 - 10 Sep 2014 20:55 #186870 by ubarose
Where is the Shakespearean digression?

I designed costumes for Comedy of Errors this past spring, and taught a class on it. It was a huge amount of fun.

Here's a picture of the female leads.

Attachment comedyoferrors.jpg not found

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Last edit: 10 Sep 2014 20:55 by ubarose.
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10 Sep 2014 21:27 #186871 by repoman
I like Macbeth best.

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10 Sep 2014 22:06 #186873 by Stan Leer
Recently read The Tempest because I had seen it referenced in a series of different media

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10 Sep 2014 22:10 #186874 by Cranberries

ubarose wrote: Where is the Shakespearean digression?


fortressat.com/forum/35-mos-eisley-canti...-been-playing#186818

Sun of York vs. Son/sonne of York

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10 Sep 2014 22:16 #186876 by san il defanso
This last week while I was unpacking our new house I found my 2nd Edition of The Riverside Shakespeare, along with something from Penguin called The Rough Guide to Shakespeare. So I decided to read Comedy of Errors, which I've never read before. It's the first Shakespeare I've interacted with since at least 2006.

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10 Sep 2014 22:26 #186879 by DukeofChutney
Richard II is probably my favourite. I read the first third of A mid Summer Nights Dream recently. Good source material for RPG adventures.

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10 Sep 2014 23:21 #186884 by SaMoKo
Haven't read Shakespeare since college

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10 Sep 2014 23:39 #186885 by Dr. Mabuse
It's odd to see Shakespeare's plays referred to as "novels", nonetheless my favourites would be Macbeth, Richard III, Titus Andronicus, Othello, Love's Labours Lost and The Tempest.

Least favourite; Winter's Tale and Measure for Measure.

[/former thespian waxing]
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10 Sep 2014 23:41 #186886 by Sevej
What I dont even...

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11 Sep 2014 09:16 #186895 by Shellhead
Trick question. Shakespeare didn't write novels, just plays and poems. I fulfilled my English Lit requirement in college by taking a class in Shakespeare, and all we studied was some of the plays. The professor was a flamboyant homosexual, which made the class fairly entertaining. After studying Shakespeare for one semester, I have never been able to take grammar Nazis seriously. Sure, it's good to have basic rules for clear communication, but languages evolve over time anyway. Reading Shakespeare was almost like studying a foreign language at times, because the language had changed so much.
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11 Sep 2014 13:16 #186913 by scrumpyjack
Yeah not sure what I was smoking when I wrote novels instead of plays. That's a great point about the language and grammar, I always found it fascinating when my english teacher explained which words and rules Shakespeare simply created to suit his style. And on that note I was lucky to have a teacher who really loved Shakespeare and made the stories come alive (excuse the cliche). He even explained all the really filthy jokes, which was a nice change of pace in a strict christian private school.
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11 Sep 2014 14:00 #186916 by repoman
I love Shakespeare. I want to point out that reading the plays is really no substitute for seeing them acted out.

Unless you are in a major metropolitan area, seeing a decent version on stage is difficult although I was pleasantly surprised by the production put on by Uba's spawn. The lead actress was quite good.

In any case, movies can take the place of live performance to a degree. My favorite Shakespeare movies:

1) Much Ado About Nothing (1993): What can I say...I love LOVE Emma Thompson. She even makes the presence of Keanu Reeves tolerable.

2) A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935): Mickey Rooney as Puck. This was the my first exposure to a Shakespeare play in a form other than the written word. Some nostalgia no doubt tainting my opinion but still the sets and costumes are great. And Rooney rocks as Puck.

3) Romeo and Juliet (1996): I like the clever updating of the scene for the play to quasi modern Verona Beach California. The true highlight though is Claire Danes....I LOVE Claire Danes. A bit too much shouting of lines but still cool.

4) Henry V (1989): Kenneth Branagh does Shakespeare very well. The intro is really cool.."Oh for a muse of fire!" and his Saint Crispin's Day speech is great. Others will say Olivier's version from 1944 is the best. Their opinion is valid.

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11 Sep 2014 14:47 #186922 by scrumpyjack

repoman wrote: I love Shakespeare. I want to point out that reading the plays is really no substitute for seeing them acted out.


True. I've seen a few at the Stratford festival, and watching the plays with great actors shows how beautiful the meter and rhythm can be, which is something I often fail to appreciate just reading them. Also thanks for pointing out the films. It just dawned on me that I've never seen a single Shakespeare film. I'll check out your list!

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11 Sep 2014 16:18 #186930 by Dr. Mabuse

repoman wrote: I love Shakespeare. I want to point out that reading the plays is really no substitute for seeing them acted out.

Unless you are in a major metropolitan area, seeing a decent version on stage is difficult although I was pleasantly surprised by the production put on by Uba's spawn. The lead actress was quite good.

In any case, movies can take the place of live performance to a degree. My favorite Shakespeare movies:

1) Much Ado About Nothing (1993): What can I say...I love LOVE Emma Thompson. She even makes the presence of Keanu Reeves tolerable.

2) A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935): Mickey Rooney as Puck. This was the my first exposure to a Shakespeare play in a form other than the written word. Some nostalgia no doubt tainting my opinion but still the sets and costumes are great. And Rooney rocks as Puck.

3) Romeo and Juliet (1996): I like the clever updating of the scene for the play to quasi modern Verona Beach California. The true highlight though is Claire Danes....I LOVE Claire Danes. A bit too much shouting of lines but still cool.

4) Henry V (1989): Kenneth Branagh does Shakespeare very well. The intro is really cool.."Oh for a muse of fire!" and his Saint Crispin's Day speech is great. Others will say Olivier's version from 1944 is the best. Their opinion is valid.


Richard III (1995): My first exposure to Sir Ian Mckellan's work. Tremendous production. I would love to see this live with him in the role.

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