Front Page

Content

Board Games

Forums

Site Tools

Submissions

About

O
oliverkinne
February 22, 2020
530 0
T
TabletopIsland
February 22, 2020
239 0

Dragoon Board Game Review

Podcasts & Videos
U
ubarose
February 21, 2020
268 0
U
ubarose
February 21, 2020
340 0

Dominion: Menagerie Coming Soon

NEW and Upcoming Games
H
Hylander47
February 21, 2020
298 0
U
ubarose
February 20, 2020
717 0
T
thegiantbrain
February 20, 2020
550 0

Megacity Oceania Review

Board Game Reviews
U
ubarose
February 19, 2020
785 0
U
ubarose
February 19, 2020
940 0

Marvel Villainous Announced

NEW and Upcoming Games
W
WadeMonnig
February 19, 2020
618 1
U
ubarose
February 18, 2020
754 0
U
ubarose
February 18, 2020
512 0

Flesh & Blood TCG Coming to the USA

NEW and Upcoming Games
O
oliverkinne
February 18, 2020
939 0
T
TabletopIsland
February 15, 2020
542 0
O
oliverkinne
February 15, 2020
1457 0

Dune Board Game Review

Board Game Reviews
T
thegiantbrain
February 13, 2020
398 0
× Use the stickied threads for short updates.

Please consider adding your quick impressions and your rating to the game entry in our Board Game Directory after you post your thoughts so others can find them!

Please start new threads in the appropriate category for mini-session reports, discussions of specific games or other discussion starting posts.

What BOOK(s) are you reading?

More
09 Sep 2019 14:22 #301578 by barrowdown

Gary Sax wrote: I remember liking Guns of August but feeling it was very dry compared to the best histories. A very "overview" sort of history that's vital but doesn't electrify.


I actually liked the dryness, but I was also listening to Dan Carlin's Hardcore History podcast on the same period which leans way towards the colorful side. So I kind of had a balance to offset any dryness that may have been present. I really liked how it bounced from government to government over each time period to cover how they were each responding to the new "inputs" being presented to them.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Gary Sax

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
09 Sep 2019 15:05 #301581 by Dr. Mabuse
I'm re-reading the First Law Trilogy by Joe Abercrombie and by god, are these books ever good! I recently re-read The Sorcerer of the Wildeeps by Kai Ashante Wilson. A beautiful sci-fantasy book set in a world long after an alien race had bred with tiny percent of the human population, and left. The descendents are looked at as demigods in the present world. Demane (dubbed the Sorcerer by others) is escorting a caravan of goods along with the Captain of the guard (also a descendant) who secretly is his lover. The world is inhabited by those of African descent and the language is enriched with African-Americanised English. Lovely, lovely storytelling and characters.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Gary Sax, Sagrilarus

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
09 Sep 2019 15:41 #301582 by RobertB

Dr. Mabuse wrote: I'm re-reading the First Law Trilogy by Joe Abercrombie and by god, are these books ever good!


I just finished re-reading Abercrombie's The Heroes, and it's good too.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Dr. Mabuse

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
12 Oct 2019 23:23 - 12 Oct 2019 23:28 #302430 by Sagrilarus
Saturn Run by Sandford and Ctein. This is hard science fiction with really good, really real science in it. It checked the box I had hoped Spacecorp would.

I'm not big on fiction but this one was especially well grounded. Good read.
Last edit: 12 Oct 2019 23:28 by Sagrilarus.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Gary Sax, mezike, birdman37

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 Oct 2019 10:31 #302433 by drewcula
I'm reading Lovecraft Country by Matt Ruff.
It's merely okay. The mid-20th C. racial prejudice exposition is a bit too much for my tastes.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
14 Oct 2019 17:11 #302467 by the_jake_1973
I just finished Gideon the Ninth by Tamryn Muir. Sci-fi necromancy and some Eldar-like bonesinging. Great novel and I am looking forward to the next installment.

I have just started the new book from Joe Abercrombie, A Little Hatred. More great writing. He really has a nice way of tying in events from the other books in this universe.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Dr. Mabuse

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 Oct 2019 08:19 #302477 by Yugblad
I'm deep into SPIDERLIGHT - in my quest to read all books featuring giant spiders!
This one feels like it’s setting me up for a huge twist.
Reads somewhat like a D&D campaign.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 Oct 2019 08:21 - 15 Oct 2019 08:24 #302478 by Yugblad
Forgot to say, just finished the first 3 books in the SPIDER WORLD saga.
It is, and it isn’t, the book you’re expecting.
Giant psychic, balloon-gliding spiders have reduced mankind to the Stone Age.

Warning: Spoiler! [ Click to expand ]
Last edit: 15 Oct 2019 08:24 by Yugblad. Reason: grammar

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 Oct 2019 10:09 #302485 by mezike

Yugblad wrote: I'm deep into SPIDERLIGHT - in my quest to read all books featuring giant spiders!
This one feels like it’s setting me up for a huge twist.
Reads somewhat like a D&D campaign.


How are you finding Tchaikovsky's books? I really enjoyed Children of Time (a little bit more than simply 'Spiders in Spaaace') so sought out a couple of his other Sci-Fi novels. Dogs of War was okay, I haven't yet been able to get into the Tripods book. Apparently the sequel to Children of Time is lacklustre so I'm wondering if he's a one-hit wonder and if his fantasy writing is any good?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
17 Oct 2019 13:29 #302545 by Joebot
I finished the The Warrior Prophet, the second book in R. Scott Bakker's Prince of Nothing series. I think I might be done reading Bakker. This book was a real slog to get through. By the end, I was just grateful to be done.

Two things about Bakker really grate on my nerves. One, the names. So many fucking names!! Names of people and cities and countries and religions, and almost none of them matter. I suppose he thinks he's adding background color, and showing off how very detailed and impressive his world-building is. But it comes off as just obnoxious noise. I've been reading fantasy novels for about 30 years now, so I'm pretty comfortable with weird fantasy names, but Bakker pushes the limits of my patience. It's almost like technobabble in a Star Trek episode -- it's just words that don't mean anything that are there to fill space.

The second thing is more of a writer quirk. The majority of the story is told from a limited, third-person point of view. The POV moves around to different characters, but you're only ever inside one person's head at a time, seeing events from that person's eyes. Pretty typical stuff. But then he does this thing when he's describing big picture events, like a big battle. It's like he pulls the camera WAAAAAAY back, and suddenly you're reading this omniscient, voiceless point of view. Instead of seeing the battle through the eyes of a character, it's like you're reading a dry, history textbook for a few pages. He does that all the time, and it's such a jarring, disorienting experience.

The book is also suuuuper grimdark, with lots of horrible people with suspect motives doing horrible things to one another. It takes a subtle hand to pull that off without descending into bleak nihilism. Bakker is not nearly as talented as, say, Martin or Abercrombie or Erickson, who deal in similar themes. Why should I care about ANY of these people when they're all fucking awful? There's no Tyrion or Logan Ninefingers to add some much-needed gallows humor.

Anyway, yeah, I think I'm done with R. Scott Bakker. I think I'm going to read some Bernard Cornwell next, as a bit of a palate cleanser.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
18 Oct 2019 13:31 #302570 by Yugblad

mezike wrote:

Yugblad wrote: I'm deep into SPIDERLIGHT - in my quest to read all books featuring giant spiders!
This one feels like it’s setting me up for a huge twist.
Reads somewhat like a D&D campaign.


How are you finding Tchaikovsky's books? I really enjoyed Children of Time (a little bit more than simply 'Spiders in Spaaace') so sought out a couple of his other Sci-Fi novels. Dogs of War was okay, I haven't yet been able to get into the Tripods book. Apparently the sequel to Children of Time is lacklustre so I'm wondering if he's a one-hit wonder and if his fantasy writing is any good?



I'm really enjoying Spiderlight - I have Children of Time ready to go next.
I like to approach things in reverse order!
The following user(s) said Thank You: mezike

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
18 Oct 2019 18:13 #302573 by Jarvis
I just finished the Broken Earth trilogy by N.K. Jemisin. I thought it was fantastic. I believe it was the first trilogy where every book won the Hugo for best fantasy novel.
The following user(s) said Thank You: RobertB, engineer Al

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
21 Oct 2019 18:34 #302634 by barrowdown
I finished The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, 1936-1945 by John Toland, which was fantastic. It is an excellent read with a focus primarily from the Japanese side and is based on a lot of research and first-person accounts and interviews when possible. It was written in 1970, so it has a lot of opportunity to interview individuals from all levels of the conflict from high level government officials down to basic infantry/sailors/pilots as well as civilians. That broad mix of viewpoints creates an interesting fabric as it will stay high level for a while covering discussions and overarching activity, but then dive into first person accounts for a while and get hyper-detailed on a specific conflict as representative of a type of action. For example, Burma and China are almost completely glossed over, but it spends four chapters on Guadalcanal.

I also read The Last Kingdom by Bernard Cornwell based on my brother's recommendation. I have not read Cornwell, but I though it was a fairly engaging historical fiction with a lot of ties to actual history. I am curious to read the rest of the series, which I have because my brother dropped off a box of books last time he visited.

I just started Lenin: The Man, the Dictator, and the Master of Terror by Victor Sebestyen. I've only read the introduction and prologue, but based on those I anticipate it will be a quick, fast paced read. The writer's style is much more fluid and vivid than Pipes' work, though it might give up some of the scholarly edge as a tradeoff.
The following user(s) said Thank You: BillyBobThwarton

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
21 Oct 2019 21:05 #302638 by Sagrilarus
Rising Sun -- I read Embracing Defeat by Dower and it was excellent as well. Americans are so fixated on the Hitler persona that I don't think we understand how seriously jacked up Imperial Japan was, even in the face of total destruction. A fascinating era and location in history, and I'm not much of a Far East guy.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
21 Oct 2019 23:13 #302643 by Gary Sax
Just finished The Last Mughal. Highly recommended. His ability to paint a portrait of this polyglot premodern place (Mughal Delhi), pre-nationalism, is breathtaking. And then to watch it all fall apart... it imparts the sense of civilizational sadness while still acknowledging the ways in which it was all fucked up.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Not Sure

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Moderators: Gary Sax
Time to create page: 0.182 seconds